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St. Augustine once said that "The World is a book and those who do not travel read only a page."
Nowadays it has become too easy for people to sit in an office trying to climb career ladders, to accumulate wealth or whatever passes for value consensus these days than simply rediscovering the feeling that they are alive and appreciating the only world we all share.
Travelling is all about the experience of new cultures, new opinions, history, ideas, scenery, food, learning about somebody and something else,  broadening your mind and being more open to experiences and ideas.

  • Athens
    Athens atena11a_mic

    Athens needs no introduction. The image of the Acropolis crowned by the Parthenon is probably the single most recognisable picture of the Balkans. It's just one of many ancient sites in the city, supplemented by one of the world's great museums. Although the city's traffic and pollution have given it a somewhat mixed reputation with travellers, the makeover in advance of the 2004 Olympics has made it more visitor-friendly - the pedestrian walkway encircling the Acropolis provides the chance to escape from the hurly-burly and contemplate the city's treasures in peace.


  • Belgrade
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    Belgrade, the capital of Serbia, was the capital of a much larger country for much of the twentieth century. It still has a dynamism and urban atmosphere that make the other former Yugoslav capitals feel a little provincial in comparison. Like many Balkan cities, an eventful history has left it without many conventionally beautiful buildings, but it compensates with a dramatic location at the confluence of the Danube and Sava rivers. The rivers are overlooked by the Kalemagdan citadel, and the Kalemagdan park, one of the nicest city parks in Europe. This is a wonderful place to enjoy an ice cream and an evening stroll along with the locals.


    Belgrade, the capital of Serbia, was the capital of a much larger country for much of the twentieth century. It still has a dynamism and urban atmosphere that make the other former Yugoslav capitals feel a little provincial in comparison. Like many Balkan cities, an eventful history has left it without many conventionally beautiful buildings, but it compensates with a dramatic location at the confluence of the Danube and Sava rivers. The rivers are overlooked by the Kalemagdan citadel, and the Kalemagdan park, one of the nicest city parks in Europe. This is a wonderful place to enjoy an ice cream and an evening stroll along with the locals.

  • Bucharest
    Bucharest bucuresti11a_mic

    Despite the massive reconstruction of the 1980s, Bucharest remains a Garden City, leafy and pleasant, with cafes open on sidewalks in the summer, and with boats on its lakes and rivers. You will be intrigued by the city's eclectic mixture of architecture, from Curtea Veche, the remains of Prince Vlad Tepes 15th century palace - he was the city's founder as well as the inspiration for "Dracula", - to Orthodox Churches, Second Empire mansions, the stolid Stalinist architecture of the communist years and the colossal 6,000 room Parliament House, the second largest building in the world after the Pentagon.


  • Budapest
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    If centuries ago the Danube river was separating two small cities, Buda and Pesta, today, it rather looks like merging them through 8 beautiful bridges, offering the tourists the image of one of the most beautiful European capital cities. Buda charms you with its medieval castles, churches and cathedrals and Pesta with its elegant boulevards and impressive buildings.


  • Chisinau
    Chisinau chisinau11a_mic

    The capital city of the Republic of Moldova is sometimes called the White City, as many of the older building are of white limestone. The old limestone quarry is now the site of the largest wine cellar in the world – the Milestii Mici wine cellar. But what really makes Chisinau worth visiting are its historical monuments, the green scenery in spring and summer time and, of course, its incredibly kind, generous and hospitable people.


  • Dubrovnik
    Dubrovnik dubrovnik_map_mic
    At the beginning of the XXI century, Dubrovnik is the jewel in the crown of one of the new secure modern democracies to emerge from the dramatic upheavals of the last decade. It is in Dubrovnik that nature lovers can enjoy a true Mediterranean landscape and sailors will find Marinas and blue sea. A gorgeous city where you can watch one of the most spectacular sunsets in a place that is as close to paradise as you'll ever be.

  • Istanbul
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    In spite of its location at the edge of Europe, Istanbul has always been right at the heart of Balkan history. Few cities have been so important for so long, and modern Istanbul is richly endowed with monuments of its imperial past. It can be a slightly melancholic place - those same monuments being a reminder that the city's multilingual, multiethnic mixture of peoples failed to survive the twentieth century. The capital of two empires is no longer even the capital of a country, the city of the Sultans having been overtaken in size and prominence by Ankara, a city of civil servants. But that hasn't made Istanbul less important - far from becoming a museum town, it just keeps on growing. Anyone who likes big cities will love Istanbul.


  • Ljubljana
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    Conveniently located in the centre of the country, the capital of Slovenia is one of Europe's smaller capital cities, but makes up in charm what it lacks in size or imposing monuments. It is easy to spend a few days here doing nothing else than relaxing and enjoying the small town atmosphere. Ljubljana is also an excellent base for day trips to many of Slovenia's other attractions.


  • Sarajevo
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    Sarajevo may well be the most likeable capital city in the Balkans. It entices many visitors into staying longer than they had planned, eating čevapčići in the Ottoman old town, whiling away the afternoon over ice cream in the comfortable armchairs of a pavement cafe, or strolling along the tranquil Miljacka River to the Goat Bridge. In few other European capitals do the mountains feel so close; a walk around its hilly suburbs reveals a different panorama at each twist in the road.
  • Skopje
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    Skopje's bazaar area is one of the most interesting in the Balkans, and the city is an excellent base for excursions: hiking around Lake Matka, admiring the Byzantine art at Sveti Pantelejmon monastery, or visiting some of Macedonia's most impressive examples of Islamic architecture in nearby Tetovo.


  • Sofia
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    Sofia is one of the oldest settlements in Europe. For over 7,000 years it has been a meeting place of the four directions of the world. Tribes and peoples came and went, civilizations flourished and declined but the city remained. Today Sofia is a modern and busy capital and a centre of Bulgaria’s political, economic and cultural life. Sofia has the convenience of a compact centre, where the main sights can be visited on foot.


  • Tirana
    Tirana tirana_map_mic

    Communist-era buildings, once grim and gray, now dance with wake-up colors - orange, lime green, sky blue - in stripes and bold patterns, creating a carnival atmosphere downtown. And let us not forget the incredible Albanian cuisine, a mix of Balkan, Turkish and European influences. Everything in Tirana is now food for our senses.


  • Vienna
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    Whether it’s the trendy scene or athletic action, wooded leisure oases or great beaches, whether you want to get married in Vienna or visit the city with your family, , visit Jewish Vienna, discover the city on a bicycle, or enjoy a wellness program – you are certain to find what you are looking for in this multi-faceted city. Also, you can find dozens of traditional cafés in Vienna’s Old City. Here you will encounter Viennese coffee house culture in its most original form.


  • Zagreb
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    With it's rich historical and cultural heritage that has roots in Central European urban culture, enriched by Mediterranean and Balkan traditions, Zagreb still keeps its charm, and an atmosphere that makes it a unique city. Nowadays, Zagreb is the heart of contemporary Croatia’s culture, art, sports, and academics. The unique blend of medieval towers, 19th century palaces, open-air markets, and ancient cathedrals, make Zagreb the perfect city to explore.